Nick Schklair

About Nick Schklair

Nick Schklair holds a B.S. from St. John’s University, an MBA from Amos Tuck School of Dartmouth College, and received a certification from the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology (WPAFB, OH) in Cost Analysis. While he would describe himself as both an entrepreneur and an intrapreneur, he has written over 140 business-related articles, and published a book on business start ups, funding and initial operation.




Nick Schklair is an author, writer, consultant and executive holding a B.S. from St. John's University's, NY, an MBA from Amos Tuck School of Dartmouth College, NH and a Certificate from the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology (WPAFB, OH) in Cost Analysis. He has written over 140 business-related articles, and published a book on business start ups, funding and initial operation. Among other literary pursuits he is also an accomplished satirist addressing the subject matter of business and society, in general.

Nick has published a new book of satire lampooning large industrial enterprise and the strangle hold with which political correctness has engulfed them. Additionally, he is currently underway in the writing of a new book focusing on intrapreneurship.

Signs That Define an Intrapreneurial Organization

SIGN

What companies are most successful? What defines innovation? Intrapreneurs are the key to an innovative, resilient, consistent business.

So You Want to be An Intrapreneur…What Do You Bring to the Table?

Businessmen discussing document

In today’s economy, bright and motivated employees can go far – just make sure you’re suited for intrapreneurship before you take the plunge.

In Search of the Intrapreneur: Choosing the Right People

Intrepreneurs stand out in the crowd; choose your in-house hires carefully! Image by m3_fs

When you’re tasked with hiring from within to staff an intrepreneurial department, one of your first jobs should be to compile a list of characteristics that fit within a job description for the employees.

Finding New Markets: Middle Managers as Intrepreneurs

If you need to find a new market for your company, get out of the office and talk to your customers. Image by kroseel

You’re a mid-level manager, and you’ve been tasked with finding new markets: You’re suddenly an Intrepreneur. Where do you start the search for a new line?

Pages: 1 2

Contrasting Views: The Entrepreneur and the Intrapreneur

headshot-colorized

Intrepreneurs and entrepreneurs: They view business activities differently, but have many characteristics in common.