Hurricane Sandy Tracker: Where is the Super Storm Now?

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Hurricane Sandy’s Path as of Late October 29, 2012. Image Credit: National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Sandy is the storm of the hour, and this Halloween’s storm has been dubbed “The Bride of Frankenstorm.”

The hurricane formed as a tropical storm on October 22nd, and the presence of hot towers made it likely that the storm would increase in intensity, which unfortunately was the case.

How Hurricane Sandy Developed

Sandy increased rapidly into a Category Two hurricane status, blasting its way through Cuba and causing 22 deaths.

Sandy also raced through Jamaica and the Bahamas, causing flooding. In recent days, Sandy has merged with a cold front near the U.S. East Coast, and the combination of the two storms has caused a much larger storm area that stretches across the coast for thousands of miles.

In addition to problems associated with the vast area that the storm covers, the fact that high wind and rain is combining with a higher than usual tide has caused preparations for high storm surges in coastal areas.

Storm Tracker: Where is Hurricane Sandy Now?

Sandy’s still offshore, but landfall is expected early in the evening of October 29, 2012, in southern New Jersey and Delaware. There are concerns that life-threatening storm surges may occur in those areas, combined with hurricane-force winds of 75 mph.

Areas of New York City are already experiencing flooding, with up to 11 feet of water expected in lower Manhattan. More than 375,000 people have been urged to leave the area.

Hurricane Sandy’s Projected Path

Hurricane Sandy is expected to bring 3 to 8 inches of rain to areas along the US East Coast and inland areas as it arcs its way up toward central Canada. In addition, heavy snowfall and blizzard conditions are expected from western Maryland to southwestern Virginia, with accumulations of 1 to 2 feet of snow anticipated in these areas. Sandy will likely move inland then, paying a visit to areas around Rochester, New York on Halloween. Hurricane Sandy is projected to hit the Ottawa region on November 1st as a tropical depression, then it will likely move on towards New Brunswick for November 3rd.

Resources:

NASA. Hurricane Sandy. (2012). Accessed October 29, 2012.

National Hurricane Center. Advisories for Hurricane Sandy. (2012). Accessed October 29, 2012.

National Weather Service. Centre of Sandy Heading Toward Southern New Jersey. (2012). Accessed October 29, 2012.

Record Online. Crane Topples in Midtown Manhattan; 375,000 ordered to evacuate from New York City. (2012). Accessed October 29, 2012.

The Telegraph. Interactive Map. (2012). Accessed October 29, 2012.

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© Copyright 2012 Tricia Edgar, All rights Reserved. Written For: Decoded Science

Comments

  1. MarineWife! says

    COnfused?
    this was a hurricane. the governors are idiots who are stupid and ignorant. This was no tropical storm. I was there for it this was a hurricane.. all there doing is adding insult to injury…

  2. COnfused? says

    Sorry for everyones loss and hardships. But was this a Hurricane like all of the news is reporting or was it a tropical storm like the governor of NY is saying it was. He and other governors said this for insurance purposes. Just asking because you can never tell when the media or politians are lying.

  3. Joy Tomlinson says

    WOW.
    That is the only word to express what the storm was like!
    we live in Lake Orion, MI and i could not believe how strong the wind got here!
    we had just gotten back from traveling through tennessee and we could not believe that it was snowing down there when we saw the news!
    Hurricane Sandy wins the prize for the wierdest weather:)

  4. Mike says

    History repeats itsself…………Winter History from the 50s…………this type of weather will continue thru the Spring repeating the weather pattern we had in the 50s when these type of Storms and Blizzards occurred. It’s gonna be a long, Cold and Rainy Winter.

  5. says

    Apart from irrecoverable human loss (my God bless them). The storm recovery would be a harder task, apart from the transportation systems and property damages; there were also many non tangible damages caused due to this superstorm. According to ‘Reuters’, Hurricane Sandy appears to have easily caused twice or even three times the losses of last year’s Hurricane Irene. Whereas, Bloomberg reports that Hurricane Sandy threatens $20 Billion in Economic Damage.

    Besides significant property damage, Hurricane Sandy will cost billions of dollars in lost business, and partial or complete data loss from companies’ physical datacenters.

    This made me thought that though it’s an unfortunate lesson to have to learn the hard way, especially this hard way. But, natural disasters like hurricanes, floods or superstorms are dramatic examples of the value of cloud solutions when it comes to resiliency in the face of a catastrophe, and the ability to recover and resume operations as quickly as possible.

    Here is an article that talks about some of the ways that how cloud Technology can help rebound after the unforeseen / Sandy hurricane:

    http://www.dincloud.com/blog/cloud-backup-disaster-recovery-vs-hurricane-superstorm-and-more

    It’s a unique way to look at cloud services, and I think you’ll find this approach more in line with running a resilient business.

  6. Betty H. says

    Nice to see something about where the storm is headed in Canada; all the TV coverage seems to assume that the world ends at the border.

  7. Bella Sabra says

    Isn’t it time for Romney to blame Pres. Obama for the storm. Then promise if he were elected he knows how to take care of it. How many more lies???

  8. Kimberly (14) says

    Lol The The Bride of Frankenstorm. But Sandy Put The Whole Of Canarsiie Under Water Cars Were SWimming Away .

  9. carol Coulter says

    Thank you, The best map and impossible to find. It is still tracking on Wednesday. I have relatives in New Hampshire and near Ottawa.

  10. says

    The reason for this big storm and the ones coming is associated with a warming Atlantic and cooling Pacific. This is the same pattern of the 50?s. It has nothing to do with climate change.

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