Stomach Flu Cramps: Is There Anything You Can Do For Norovirus Symptoms?

Taking ginger for stomach spasms? You can find the fresh root in the produce section of the grocery store: This is what ginger root looks like. Image by Fastily

Taking ginger for stomach spasms? You can find the fresh root in the produce section of the grocery store: This is what ginger root looks like. Image by Fastily

They’re calling it a SuperBug.

This year’s stomach flu, also known as viral gastroenteritis, is having a wide impact this year, affecting most families – even Queen Elizabeth caught the norovirus in early March.

Sometimes, the stomach cramps and pain are the worst part about the stomach flu.

Is there anything you can do to ease this symptom of the norovirus that’s hitting so hard this year?

Stomach Flu Symptoms: Cramps and Nausea

Stomach flu causes inflammation of the lining of the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Viral gastroenteritis is highly contagious and affects millions of people around the world every year with vomiting, watery diarrhea, headache, fever, chills, and abdominal pain and cramping. This year’s strain is from Australia, and is a new strain, so no one has immunity built up – this is why so many people are getting so very sick.

When a virus infects our bodies, our immune system works to get rid of the virus. In the case of the stomach flu, the body works to get rid of the virus via diarrhea and/or vomiting. When the stomach, small intestine, and/or the large intestine become inflamed, this causes the pain we feel in our abdomens when we are sick. Stomach cramps can be painful; everything from a mild ache to a sharp, stabbing pain.

Note: When you have the stomach flu, you generally feel pain in more than half of your stomach. If your pain is only in one part of the abdomen (localized pain) it could be a sign of problem with another organ such as your gallbladder or appendix.

Stomach Cramps: How Long Will They Last?

So how long will you feel bad with the stomach flu and cramps? According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, symptoms appear within 12 to 48 hours after being exposed to the virus and you can expect to feel better within one to three days. While waiting it out, is there anything you can do to help ease the cramps? Ginger and peppermint are two herbs that might be able to help.

  • Ginger: In China, the people have used ginger to treat diarrhea and nausea for over 2,000 years. Ginger comes in different forms, from the actual ginger root to capsules, oils, and food and drinks that contain ginger. Researchers have studied the use of ginger, finding that it can help with nausea and vomiting that come with everything from pregnancy to chemotherapy. For those with the stomach flu, science affirmed in 2005 that ginger calms stomach cramps and spasms.

Click to Read Page Two: Peppermint for Stomach Cramps

© Copyright 2013 Janelle Vaesa, MPH, All rights Reserved. Written For: Decoded Science

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